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Carb Killa High Protein Shake

By: Grenade

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Grenade Carb Killa High Protein Shake Smooth And Creamy High Protein Drink Supports Muscle Growth And Recovery


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A SERIOUSLY INDULGENT SMOOTH AND CREAMY HIGH PROTEIN SHAKE

SMOOTH & INDULGENT TASTE
HIGH PROTEIN - 24g PER BOTTLE
UNDER 200 CALORIES

 

KEY FACTS

Following on from the global success of the iconic Carb Killa®bars, Grenade® has developed Carb Killa Shake.

Carb Killa Shake is a smooth and creamy high protein drink with under 200 calories and is seriously indulgent. With 24g of protein and 7.3g of carbs, Carb Killa Shake is a convenient way to consume additional protein between meals without unwanted calories or carbs.

Initially in 3 delicious flavours, this thick and creamy shake is as technologically advanced as the bars and can be consumed throughout the day.

 

RESEARCH

Delivering 24 grams of protein per shake, Carb Killa Shake is a high protein treat that has been designed to provide balanced complete sources of protein, while limiting the level of simple, processed refined sugars. Unlike many other shakes / smoothies, Carb Killa® Shake is unique in the fact it is low in carbs.

The benefits of protein are well known and the role it plays as a key macro nutrient within the body mean it’s vital we consume enough to meet our goals.[1] In addition to that, the added benefits of a high protein low carb diet are much more widely documented, suggesting they are more reliable way to reduce body fat and improve muscular body composition. [2],[3]

Ideal for those; on a low carb diet and avoiding sugar and processed carbs, those wanting to gain lean muscle mass with a high protein, low carb drink.

Protein contributes to the growth and maintenance of muscle mass.

 

Reference

1 Tipton KD, Ingestion of casein and whey proteins result in muscle anabolism after resistance exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Dec;36(12):2073-81.

2.Westman EC, et al. SD (1 August 2007). "Low-carbohydrate nutrition and metabolism". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 86 (2): 276–84. PMID 17684196.

3.Merchant, Anwar T.; et al. (2009). "Carbohydrate Intake and Overweight and Obesity among Healthy Adults". Journal of the American Dietetic Association 109 (7): 1165–72. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2009.04.002. PMC 3093919. PMID 19559132.

European Economic Community Council (EEC). Directive on food labeling. Official Journal of the European Communities. No. L 276/40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

Commission of the European Communities. Reports of the Scientific Committee for Food concerning sweeteners. Sixteenth Series. Report EUR 10210 EN. Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg, 1985.

Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, IPCS Toxicological evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants: Maltitol, WHO Food Additives Series: 32, 1993, pp. 101-104.

Life Sciences Research Office. Evaluation of the net energy value of maltitol. April 1999. (unpublished)

Office of the Federal Register, General Services Administration, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Section 101.80, Health Claims: dietary sugar alcohols and dental caries. Washington, DC, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1998.

Modderman JP. Safety Assessment of Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysates. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 18:80-104, 1993.

Petition to Affirm Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) Status of Maltitol As A Food Ingredient, by Towa Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., filed December 23,1986 with the United States Food and Drug Administration.